What people are saying about the Austin cop caught speeding on MoPac

 

An assistant Austin police chief was recently caught on a dashboard camera video in February after he got pulled over for driving 92 mph on MoPac Boulevard (Loop 1) and drove off with a warning.

Assistant Chief Chris McIlvain was in an unmarked patrol car on his way to Waco to see a Baylor basketball game when he got pulled over for speeding.

More: Clocked at 92 mph on MoPac, Austin assistant police chief gets warning

After a short discussion about his speeding, McIlvain apologized for his speed, and the officer who pulled him over said “Take care, buddy.”

When news broke of the traffic stop, Austin interim police chief Brian Manley called a press conference to say that he ordered McIlvain be issued a $195 ticket.

“I expect officers of this department to comply with the law, whether it be criminal or traffic laws, just like we expect the citizens to,” Manley said Tuesday.

Readers, however, were quick to sound off on the video on social media.

Some admired that anyone could get up to 92 mph on MoPac, regardless of who it was…

While many people were angry at a perceived level of favoritism within the police department…

While some people weren’t that shocked by the incident…

While @EvilMoPacATX just tweeted what we were all thinking.

https://twitter.com/EvilMopacATX/status/846846043455209472

What about you? What do you think? Let us know in the comments.

Ruth Negga of ‘Loving’ shows you how to make a proper Irish coffee

 

If you saw last year’s “Loving,” Austin director Jeff Nichols’ film about the landmark 1967 Loving v. Virginia Supreme Court case that decriminalized interracial marriage in America, you know Ruth Negga can act.

031416 SXSW film

But despite her great accent and acting performance in that film, Negga isn’t American; she’s Ethiopian and Irish. And today, in honor of St. Patrick’s Day, she’s teaching everyone how to make a proper Irish coffee.

Read our review: In ‘Loving,’ love wins

In a video for Vanity Fair, a pink-dress-clad Negga demonstrates the proper technique for creating the cocktail.

“I have never done this before, and never in a pink dress, so we’ll see how this goes,” Negga says as she starts to pour some coffee.

More: Where to celebrate St. Patrick’s Day in Austin

Negga’s recipe involves about a third glass of coffee, half a glass of whiskey (“the most important ingredient”), a heaping of sugar and a little bit of cream.

Watch the full video below.

 

Is this Garth Brooks SXSW tweet shameless? Let’s let the friends in low places decide

 

By now, the news is out— Garth Brooks is indeed playing a free show Saturday night at Auditorium Shores for South By Southwest. He announced the free show at an 11 a.m. press conference Friday at the Austin Convention Center, where he previewed a snippet of his new single “Ask Me How I Know.”

Garth Brooks discusses his upcoming show at Auditorium Shores during a press conference at SXSW on Friday, March 17, 2017. DEBORAH CANNON / AMERICAN-STATESMAN

Tickets for the show were available at noon Friday but sold out within minutes.

Got $1,000? That’s what Garth Brooks tickets are going for on Craigslist

Brooks’ streaming partner, Amazon Music (he famously refused to put any of his music on any streaming service until October 2016) tweeted out that the show was sold out a mere five minutes after they went on sale.

Brooks’ team retweeted the Amazon Music tweet with what could be interpreted as a bit of hubris.

What does this mean? Are we to understand the implication of that tweet is that Garth Brooks LITERALLY the epitome of SXSW? Does his ego need to be fenced in? Is this just a shameless attempt to rope the wind of social media?

Maybe, but it also looks like the @SXSW part of that tweet was meant to literally mean “Garth Brooks is at the SXSW Conference” and not meant to equivocate Garth Brooks with the event.

At any rate, tomorrow will come, and it will bring a free Garth Brooks show.

More: Tickets sold out for free Garth Brooks show Saturday at Auditorium Shores

SXSW-goers find Austin’s lack of Uber, Lyft disturbing

 

South By Southwest is in full swing, which means crowds. Crowds everywhere, full of people with panels and parties to attend.

Many of those people forgot (or didn’t know) that Uber and Lyft no longer operate within the Austin city limits. And when it rains all weekend, as it did last weekend, people got upset at the gouged prices and long wait times for Austin alternatives Fasten and RideAustin.

Fasten is the latest mobile ride-hailing app to jump into the Austin market. Credit: Fasten

More: What we learned about Austin’s ride-hailing options by testing six of Austin’s ride-hailing apps

Making matters worse, both Fasten and RideAustin went down on Saturday night’s rainstorms, creating issues for people who needed rides, and needed them ASAP.

Local ride-hailing service RideAustin posted on Facebook early Sunday morning that its database locked up throughout most of the evening Saturday, and Kirill Evdakov, CEO of Fasten, confirmed that service also had problems, beginning a little after 8 p.m. Saturday. He called SXSW, rainy weather, and glitches with other services simultaneously “a perfect storm” that led to Fasten receiving about 12 times as many ride requests as normal.

More: Two Austin ride-hailing services report problems in first days of SXSW

During the outage, many people complained on Twitter about the resulting price surges…

https://twitter.com/HeyHeyESJ/status/840948977986093056

While some people who just got into town were aghast that Austin does not have Uber or Lyft anymore…

https://twitter.com/Jason/status/841031230997032961

https://twitter.com/tjparker/status/840551537235644417

One person was angry at Uber and Lyft for leaving Austin after the May election that included Proposition 1…

While another was worried about how RideAustin’s app could legally exist because it looks so close to Uber’s…

While many people thought the whole idea of complaining about transportation during a huge conference event was preposterous…

https://twitter.com/sssssparkers/status/841083082170068994

https://twitter.com/samfbiddle/status/841047517567569920

And others simply found (gasp!) other means of transportation for the weekend.

 

Anyhow, the whole event got its own Twitter moment Sunday night:

However, many people who arrived in town Thursday night for SXSW Interactive were well aware of the ridesharing situation in Austin. The following is from breaking news reporter Katie Hall, who went out to Austin-Bergstrom International Airport Thursday night to interview conference-goers.

Britt Deyan, of San Francisco, landed in Austin on Thursday night for SXSW Interactive. Deyan said that SXSW had been good about sharing the fact that Uber and Lyft no longer gave rides in Austin.

“Every communication I was sent about SXSW told me Uber wasn’t here,” Deyan said as she climbed into a taxi.

Alisa Hetrick and Sami Huerta, both of Minneapolis, also grabbed a taxi after landing at the Austin-Bergstrom International Airport. Hetrick and Huerta said they had been told by friends in Austin, who invited them to SXSW, that Uber and Lyft didn’t operate in Austin.

A group of six Mashable employees huddled together outside the airport after landing in Austin, discussing the ride-hailing app RideAustin. Their company had called a car ahead of time to pick them up, they said. A few of the people in the group said they were well aware of the fact that Uber and Lyft left Austin because their website had written about it. One of them, however, was not.

“I didn’t know until just now,” she said, after asking the reporter for ride-hailing app suggestions. “After the tragedy that happened a couple years ago at SXSW, I think they’re asking for another tragedy.” She declined to give her name.

What about you? Have you been having a tough time getting around at SXSW? Let us know in the comments.

Statesman reporters Katie Hall and Elizabeth Findell contributed to this report.

Matthew McConaughey’s Trump opinion: What people are saying

Austin actor Matthew McConaughey made waves this week after video was released of a BBC One interview he did over the weekend. The video has since been deleted, but in the segment, interviewer Andrew Marr asked the “Gold” star whether it’s time “Hollywood and the cultural elite of America” gave Trump a break.

Matthew McConaughey and Camila Alves attend a party at the Highball before the Austin premiere of McConaughey's movie "Gold" on Jan. 12, 2017. Contributed by Rick Kern
Matthew McConaughey and Camila Alves attend a party at the Highball before the Austin premiere of McConaughey’s movie “Gold” on Jan. 12, 2017. Contributed by Rick Kern

McConaughey’s answer? “He’s our president. It’s very dynamic and divisive of an inauguration in time that we’ve ever had. At the same time, it’s time for us to embrace.”

The actor known for his “just keep livin'” ethos went on to say, “Shake hands with this fact, and be constructive with him over the next four years. So even those that most strongly disagree with his principals or things he’s said or done, which is another thing, we’ll see what he does compared to what he had said. No matter how much you even disagreed along the way, it’s time to think about how constructive can you be. Because he’s our president for the next four years, at least. President of the United States.”

More McConaughContent: “Going for ‘Gold’: McConaughey talks shady deals, stringy hair”

Fan reaction on social media to the statement was mixed. Some argued that McConaughey was “as dense as the characters who made him famous,” while many social media users remarked that they were glad a celebrity wasn’t advocating for a complete overthrow of the government (like Madonna and Sarah Silverman have done in recent weeks).

And yes, everyone made the same “This is not alright, alright, alright” joke, but one Redditor went for this (now obvious in hindsight) joke instead: “He’s alt-right, alt-right, alt-right…”

Here’s the best of the rest in McConaughey reaction online:

https://twitter.com/AmeriClayton/status/827588852239970304

https://twitter.com/angrypaws/status/827195678149459968

Merriam-Webster gives another vocabulary lesson after Trump’s refugee ban

The Orthodox Union and the Rabbinical Council of America are responsible for the word atop Merriam-Webster Dictionary’s “Trend Watch” tool Monday. The tool tracks popular word lookups on Merriam-Webster’s website and publishes the results in order to provide context about what those words mean.

websters

 

What was that highest trending word on Monday? That would be “anathema,” a noun which here means “someone or something intensely disliked or loathed.” It was trending because The Orthodox Union and the Rabbinical Council of America, two of the largest associations of American Orthodox rabbis and synagogues in the country, released a joint statement condemning President Trump’s executive order to close America’s border to refugees and people from predominantly Muslim countries.

The statement made it into an Associated Press article on Sunday:

“The Orthodox Union, the largest association for American Orthodox synagogues, acknowledged the complexities of fighting terror, but said ‘discrimination against any group based solely upon religion is wrong and anathema to the great traditions of religious and personal freedoms upon which this country was founded,'” the AP report reads.

More: Trump says his order didn’t cause weekend airport chaos

According to Merriam-Webster, “anathema” has been in use in English since the early 16th century, when it was adopted from Latin and Greek. In Greek, it used to mean “anything devoted,” but shifted to mean “anything devoted to evil,” specifically in reference to an excommunication or the person who had been excommunicated. By the 17th century, it began to be used in the way it is used today (especially by the Catholic Church), indicating strong negative feelings to a thing, person, or concept, which may be related to religion, or maybe not.

The two Jewish groups were not the only religious groups that condemned the ban, according to the AP. The U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops said it “strongly disagreed” with the sanctions, and the Conservative and Reform movements of Judaism, Church World Service and more than 2,000 other faith leaders voiced their concern over the ban.

This wasn’t the first time the dictionary has weighed in on matters of national politics. Just last week(!) Merriam-Webster tweeted its definition of a fact at Trump counselor Kellyanne Conway after she claimed that White House press secretary Sean Spicer was simply using “alternative facts” to describe the size of Trump’s inauguration crowd.

 

Austin Twitter to Trump: Don’t tax my Topo Chico

President Donald Trump announced his method Thursday for paying for that border wall he commissioned Wednesday: a 20 percent tax on all goods imported from Mexico.

White House Press Secretary Sean Spicer said the plan would generate $10 billion a year and “easily pay for the wall,” according to the Associated Press.

Later, Spicer said the 20 percent tariff was just one of several options available to the administration to pay for the wall.

The announcement set off a firestorm on Twitter. Users were quick to point out the many things imported from Mexico that would balloon in price if the tax is approved by Congress, like cars and car parts ($24 billion worth, according to CNN Money), telephones ($11.9 billion), refrigerators ($4.1 billion), tomatoes ($1.8 billion) and beer like Corona, Modelo and Dos Equis ($2.8 billion).

But you know what else comes from Mexico?

Topo Chico.

topo2

You know what Texans love?

Topo Chico.

The wonderful mineral water drink started trending on Twitter in Austin shortly after Trump’s tax announcement. Users were passionate, to say the least.

Other users were dispirited about the taxation of other alcohols such as tequila, Corona and Dos Equis. Republican South Carolina senator Lindsey Graham called the plan “mucho sad.”

via GIPHY

https://twitter.com/EvilMopacATX/status/824725208883986434

https://twitter.com/soniasaraiya/status/824719834764247041

What about you? Do you think the tax plan will get approved? What item would you hate to see get taxed?

John Glenn’s death: What people are saying

Former astronaut and U.S. Sen. John Glenn died on Thursday in Ohio. He was 95 years old.

 John Glenn in Cape Canaveral, Fla., before his flight into space on Feb. 20, 1962. Glenn, who was hailed as a national hero and a symbol of the space age as the first American to orbit Earth, then became a national political figure for 24 years in the Senate, died on Dec. 8, 2016. He was 95. (NASA via The New York Times)
John Glenn in Cape Canaveral, Fla., before his flight into space on Feb. 20, 1962. Glenn, who was hailed as a national hero and a symbol of the space age as the first American to orbit Earth, then became a national political figure for 24 years in the Senate, died on Dec. 8, 2016. He was 95. (NASA via The New York Times)

Glenn became the first U.S. astronaut to orbit the earth in 1962. Upon his return and retirement from space exploration, he represented Ohio in the U.S. Senate from 1974 to 1999.

Later, he became the oldest man in space when he traveled on the Space Shuttle Discovery as a payload specialist in 1998.

Glenn had been in declining health for some years. In June, The Associated Press reported he said he lost some of his eyesight from macular degeneration and a small stroke.

He was hospitalized Wednesday, but the reason for said hospitalization was not clear.

Glenn is survived by his wife of 73 years, Anna, and their children Lyn and David.

An Ohio native, Glenn died at the Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center in Columbus. Shortly after his death, remembrances and tributes to his legacy appeared on Twitter from Ohio representatives and politicians and others.

Here’s a sampling of what people had to say about the passing of John Glenn:

Ohio Gov. John Kasich called Glenn “Ohio’s ultimate hometown hero.”

Texas politicians also offered their memories and tributes to the late senator and astronaut.

Ohio State University president Michael Drake said in a statement that Glenn “leaves an undiminished legacy as one of the great people of our time.”

Ohio politicians in particular had fond memories of Glenn.

And everyone else simply marveled at all that Glenn accomplished in his life.

Travis Tritt clarifies remarks about Beyoncé’s CMA performance

Earlier this month Beyoncé performed “Daddy Lessons” on stage at the 50th Annual Country Music Association Awards with the Dixie Chicks. The performance was lauded by many cultural critics, hated by many country music fans and left many scratching their heads.

Multi-platinum country singer, songwriter, performer and musician Travis Tritt in 2004. (PRNewsFoto)

One of those left scratching their heads was country artist Travis Tritt, who took to Twitter the day after the awards ceremony to express his views.

After that tweet, he claimed in a reply that “Nobody in [country music] has done more to bridge racial gaps than me.”

After the late-night tweetstorm, he woke up to several people on the social media site labeling him a racist.

In an interview with Nash Country Daily, published last Thursday, Tritt doubled down on his opinions and clarified that his aversion to Beyoncé’s performance had nothing to do with race.

Read more: The good, the bad and the ugly of the CMAs

It wasn’t so much about just Beyoncé,” he said. “This is a complaint that I’ve heard for a long time, actually for decades. Back in the ’90s, it was Elton John or Sting or whoever. Every year the CMA television producers feel a need to bring in acts from other genres, and it’s always done to boost ratings. I understand the concept behind that but at the same time I’ve always found it a little bit insulting— from the standpoint of being a country music artist—because this is a format that I’ve been a part of since the very beginning in my career. It’s a format that I have seen grow a tremendous amount in the 27 years that I’ve been doing this.”

He went on to say that other member of the “Class of ’89” were able to sell records and sell out concert arenas without help from outside sources, which is what he feels the Beyoncé addition to the CMA lineup was.

“As part of the Class of ’89—Garth Brooks, Alan Jackson, Clint Black and myself—we saw country music album sales increase by millions over what they had ever been before. We saw an ability by all country music artists to put more fannies in concert seats than we’d ever seen before. We sold a ton of product, drew in millions and millions of fans that had never listened to country music before. I think during that period of time we’ve certainly become strong enough to stand on our own two feet without the help from outside sources. I’ve been complaining about this for years, and it’s funny to me that it took complaining about this year’s performance, before anybody paid any attention to it.”

“It’s very strange to me. I’ve had open discussions about this on social media for the last 10 days and the fact is that while there are a lot of people that try to twist this into being something different than what it is—being motivated by something different than what it’s motivated by—the fact is that this is something that I’ve been very vocal about for a long time. Race has nothing to do with it. That’s what I’ve tried to make clear from the very beginning. We should be better than that. To make everything about race—to me—it makes me sad to be honest.”

He goes on to say that his tweets were taken out of context by people who picked the story up from Twitter, and that he simply thought it made no sense to have a pop artist on a country show, no matter who it was.

“First of all, they said that I trashed Beyoncé, which I never did. I never made a statement saying anything bad about her personally. All I said was that her performance—in my humble opinion—her performance as well as any of the other performances that have been on from the pop world, including Ariana Grande, Meghan Trainor, Justin Timberlake or whoever, do not belong. I don’t think they belong on any country music show. Especially on a country music show that was a 50-year celebration—an anniversary of what was supposed to be the entire 50-year history of country music awards—the CMA Awards show. The other thing that frustrated me was the fact, and it has frustrated me for years, is the fact that for every pop performance or R&B performance or any other type of genre performance that you have on the CMA Awards, that takes time away from somebody who is a country music artist, doing country music songs, releasing country music singles to radio, selling country music under that moniker to people all across the country and across the world. That’s taking time away from them. There are other artists that could have been just as much of a draw and that really should have been involved in that slot to celebrate the music that they have helped to create.

“So many great country music artists that you can name that weren’t part of it because there is only so much time—I get that, I understand that and everybody else does too. But when you take a portion of that precious time and give it to an artist outside of our industry, it makes no sense. It makes about as much sense to me as it would make sense to bring Eminem in on the Dove Awards. But you wouldn’t do that because it doesn’t fit the format. That’s my humble opinion.”

Tritt’s new album, “A Man and His Guitar,” is an acoustic live album, and it’s on sale now.

This Texas State student’s mom is going viral for forgetting her friends’ names

For most of your life, your parents know who your friends are. They’re the people you sit next to in homeroom, your next-door neighbor, your Little League teammate — but then you move off to college, and maybe your mom doesn’t know your friends by name anymore.

That’s what happened to 21-year-old Christina Duron, a student at Texas State University, when her mom, Patti Wood, wanted to share photos of her daughter on Facebook. The only problem is that Wood wasn’t always sure who else was in the photos with Christina.

screen-shot-2016-11-22-at-9-37-24-am
Screengrab via Christina Duron

Duron shared screenshots of her mom’s Facebook posts on Twitter on Sunday.

According to Buzzfeed, this happens a lot. So Duron texted her mom to correct her friends’ names, but even then, Wood was confused.

Duron told Buzzfeed, “My friends were a little offended when it first started happening, but now they think it’s pretty hilarious and they take it in stride.”

Poor mom. She means well. Here’s hoping Duron doesn’t have to spend all of Thanksgiving break explaining her friends’ names to Wood.