Don’t open your eyes underwater at Barton Springs? Here’s what it looks like

Unless you snorkel or open your eyes underwater, you might not have seen what it looks like underwater at Barton Springs, where the water is a cool 70 to 74 degrees.

This is the color of Barton Springs in the middle of July. Addie Broyles / American-Statesman

WATCH: Barton Springs isn’t really 68 degrees. How warm is it?

Well, have a look.

I took this video earlier today with my iPhone in an underwater case that was the best impulse buy of last summer.

RELATED: Former Barton Springs lifeguards recall life on the stand

PHOTOS: Barton Springs Pool way, way back when

As temperatures continues to rise, Barton Springs will fill up earlier each day.

Here are a few tips so you can enjoy your own visit:

  • Parking is already someone chaotic already, so be prepared to walk from one of the upper parking lots in Zilker Park.
  • Entry fee is $3 if you’re a resident of Austin, $8 if you’re not. Kids are $1 or $2, depending on their age.
  • You can pay with a card at one of the meters outside both the north and south entrances.
  • Bring a floatie, but leave the food and drinks behind. You can’t bring anything to eat or drink besides water into Barton Springs.
  • Entrance to the pool is free before 8 a.m. and after 9 p.m. The pool opens at 5 a.m. and closes at 10 p.m.
  • On full moon nights, where people flock to the pool to howl at the moon, the park can fill to capacity, so don’t wait until 9 p.m. if you really want to get in.

RELATED:
At Barton Springs, lifeguard job takes on sunscreen-slathered mystique
Need adventure? Swim naked at Barton Springs
Austin360 Summer Fun Guide

 

Check out this delightfully quirky antique shop, bed & breakfast for sale outside of Austin

Want to open your own antique shop? How about your own bed and breakfast? Want to live there, too?

Courtesy Twist Tours

This wonderfully quirky property for sale on Highway 290 in Paige (between Giddings and Elgin, about an hour’s drive east of Austin) can give you all of that and more.

PHOTOS: Quirky antique store, bed & breakfast for sale in Paige

It’s currently an antiques and salvage business, and the $560,000 price tag includes all the inventory inside the store front (except the inventory in the rented-out booths), which is quite a lot:

Courtesy Twist Tours

In addition to the storefront, there’s a recently remodeled private space that can be used as a bed and breakfast, living space or vacation home. According to Moxie Realty Group, the current owners will even consider selling the furnishings inside.

Courtesy Twist Tours

As if that’s not enough for you, there’s more than half an acre of land just waiting to be developed or used as parking.

You can find more information about the property at Moxie Realty Group.

New San Antonio H-E-B adding a drive-thru barbecue restaurant

 

It’s no secret Texans love their barbecue. It’s also a verifiable truth that H-E-B is one of the mot beloved grocery stores in the state, and maybe even America. Put the two together, and you’ve got a winning formula.

RICARDO B. BRAZZIELL/AMERICAN-STATESMAN

That’s right, Texas. H-E-B is about to introduce drive-thru barbecue stands to certain stores starting in August, the San Antonio Express-News reports.  Customers will be able to enjoy meals from True Texas BBQ, the grocery chain’s barbecue brand. The restaurant will also serve breakfast tacos, because of course it will.

More: Torchy’s Tacos lands on ‘11 absolute best taco shops’ online list

“Even if families don’t need to necessarily do a full shop, the True Texas BBQ will be a spot where families can go and dine together and enjoy what is arguably some of the best barbecue in Texas,” H-E-B spokesperson Dya Campos told the Express-News Wednesday.

Sadly for Austinites, it looks like we’re still stuck waiting in line at Franklin. So far, the only store to feature the True Texas BBQ restaurant will be in San Antonio, as part of a new 118,000-square-foot H-E-B in the southwest corner of Loop 1604 and Bulverde Road.

This in’t the first time H-E-B has partnered with restaurants to enhance the grocery shopping experience. Hutto recently opened a 24-hour Whataburger drive-thru at one of its new H-E-B locations. And let’s not forget you can also get that fancy Whataburger ketchup and Taco Cabana sauce at H-E-B.

Related: Texas teen brags about stealing doughnuts from H-E-B

Soon you’ll be able to get a tattoo and a haircut in the same place, because Austin

If you’ve ever gotten a haircut and left the salon wishing you had made a more permanent change than trimmed sideburns, we have good news. A combination barbershop and tattoo parlor is opening in Austin next month.

(Photo by Brian Nixon)

Tried & True Barber & Tattoo is set to open April 10 at 6501 South Congress Ave., according to CultureMap Austin.

MORE: Ingrid Michaelson got a tattoo before her show in Austin

From CultureMap:

“In the early 20th century, it was common for a tattoo artist to rent space in the back of a barbershop. Plus, with both professions being so similar in nature, it’s too cool of an idea not to continue the tradition,” say the owners in a joint statement.

On its Facebook page, Tried & True writes that it “is a full service barber shop and tattoo studio offering clipper & scissor cuts, straight razor shaves, and beard trimming and custom tattoo design.” Walk-ins will be accepted, as well as appointments.

PHOTOS: Star of Texas Tattoo Art Revival in January

CultureMap quotes the owners as saying that South Austin is a “hidden gem” not yet overrun with chain stores, which makes it the right spot for their buzz-and-ink boutique. However, it seems like such a one-stop-shop personal style headquarters would be welcomed just about anywhere in city limits, because we do love our tattoos.

RELATED READ: Austin man gets tattoo of viral blue and black dress

Why does Matthew McConaughey live in Austin? The answer is simple

Sure, the Uvalde-born Matthew McConaughey is a Texan’s Texan with an obvious affinity for the Lone Star State …

EXHIBIT A: Yes, that's Matthew McConaughey back there cheering on a Longhorn touchdown during an October 1999 game. Photo by Sung Park / American-Statesman
EXHIBIT A: Yes, that’s Matthew McConaughey back there cheering on a Longhorn touchdown during an October 1999 game. Photo by Sung Park / American-Statesman

… but the Hollywood superstar could live anywhere he wants — and afford to bring plenty of Texas with him — why does he live in Austin?

The answer is simple: Family. In an interview with ABC News film and TV critic Peter Travers, McConaughey said “my mother is there, the rest of my family is there, part of the reason for going back there was having kids.”

McConaughey has lived here in Austin with his wife, Camila Alves, and their three children. His mom, Kay, lives in the Sun City retirement community near Georgetown.

Matthew McConaughey and Camila Alves attend a party at the Highball before the Austin premiere of McConaughey's movie "Gold" on Jan. 12, 2017. Contributed by Rick Kern
Matthew McConaughey and Camila Alves attend a party at the Highball before the Austin premiere of McConaughey’s movie “Gold” on Jan. 12, 2017. Contributed by Rick Kern

Last week, McConaughey appeared on ABC’s “Good Morning America” to promote his new film, “Gold” — wearing, fittingly, a shirt emblazoned with Texas yellow roses …

RELATED: Photos of Matthew McConaughey through the years

About 219 things we learned and loved about Texas in 2016

Personally, I’d rather take a whomping with a stout stick than spend much time looking back on 2016. But if you’re up for it, l’ll guide you through some of the Texas stuff we learned and loved in the last year …

If you’ve ever woken up hungover in a tent in Terlingua, we talked about how that probably happened.

terlingua

Look back at the 50-year history of the Terlingua chili cookoff(s)


Love ’em or love to hate ’em, Texas A&M University hit 140 years old this year. And we honored them (albeit a day late).

Photo by Dave Thomas

Ten great Aggie things for Texas A&M’s 140th birthday


Our Oh, Texas Road Trip to the Brady Goat Cookoff had its moments, but we made a stop along the way to look for treasure.

dsc_0219

Oh, Texas Road Trip: The battle of Calf Creek and Jim Bowie’s lost silver


This was one of our more popular lists about Texas. I reckon a lot of you are feeling guilty.

texas-collage

Top 10 Texas sins: Read this list and repent, Texans!


When you crest that rise on that Farm-to-Market road at 75 mph and there’s a buzzard congregation gathered ’round the remains of something that was easier to recognize before it wandered into traffic … what are you going to do? What are the buzzards going to do?

RBB need for speed 2

Watch out for the vultures: 8 tips for Texas road trips


What kind of Texan doesn’t love horny toads? In the future, sadly, it’ll probably be most of ’em, as the critters pass into legend and memory. Y’all better appreciate ’em while you can.

A Texas horned lizard basks in the sun at Franklin Mountains State Park in El Paso. Photo by Pam LeBlanc.

An appreciation: Long live the Texas horny toad


To drink a cold beer in old bar is to give Darwin the finger — to celebrate that which demands the world evolve around it. You can say the same about an old dancehall. Or an old barbecue joint.

jwj Southside 0306.jpg

This is one for the aged: Five of Texas’ oldest icons


When we stumbled across his name on Texas State Historical Association’s website, we had no idea you could pack so much drama into one eccentric ornithologist.

kincaid

The Cassowary died 31 years ago today: The genius life and sad death of an Austin ornithologist


And finally, the Texas blog that needs no explanation …

tex180horiz

Happy birthday, Texas: Here’s 180 things we love about you


Thanks for reading, everyone. We’ll write more in 2017.

What we love about Austin: Top picks

175

Today, the Austin360 cover story was a (long) list of things we love about Austin. We know there are millions to include, but we were limited by space so we stuck to 175. Did we miss yours? Let us know in the comments here or on the full story. Want a visual aid? We built a gallery of the 170 picks that could be depicted through photos. Here were the top picks from each staff member that participated:

Arianna Auber: beer, wine and spirits writer: Sipping on any one of the 24 thoughtfully curated craft beers on tap at Hi Hat Public House. This little eastside bar, with always friendly service and a menu of gourmet comfort food, helped develop my love of beer and discover the welcoming community surrounding it here. Try Hi Hat on a Tuesday, when you can get two tacos and a pint for $10. (hihatpublichouse.com)

Michael Barnes: people, places, culture and history writer: Walking anywhere in Austin. Doesn’t matter where. Mostly, however, in the central city, where, thanks to the Great Streets program, pedestrians are safe, shaded, comfortable and happy. (austintexas.gov/page/great-streets)

Peter Blackstock: music writer: Weekly residencies at the Continental Cluband Continental Gallery. We tend to take them for granted, but faraway fans of established artists such as James McMurtry, Alejandro Escovedo, Dale Watson and Jon Dee Graham are rightly amazed to learn that Austinites can hear them play most every week at the anchor of SoCo. (continentalclub.com)

Addie Broyles: food writer: With more than a dozen farmers markets taking place on just about every day of the week, it’s easy to find yourself sampling some of the most interesting locally produced food products Austin has to offer, from kimchi and kombucha to kolaches from a food truck and some of the best tamales in Central Texas.

Sharon Chapman: entertainment editor: Yappy hours, off-leash parks, day cares, parades and more rescue groups than you can name: Dog cultureis alive and thriving in our pet-friendly city (this year even saw the first ever Austin Pittie Limits). My two wishes for my fellow Austin dog lovers: Everyone obey leash laws, and everyone pick up after their beloved four-legged pals.

Nancy Flores: culture reporter: Standing on the top step of the St. Edward’s University Main Building, which is perched on a hill with panoramic views of the Austin downtown skyline. When I first moved to Austin from the small town of Eagle Pass to attend St. Edward’s, looking out at the impressive view meant a world of possibilities ahead. (stedwards.edu)

Omar L. Gallaga: technology culture writer: The incredible collection of cabinets and pinball machines atPinballz Arcade make this North Austin institution a great place for a nerd party. With a castle-themed Pinballz Kingdom opening in Buda, South Central Texas is getting arcade love as well. (pinballzarcade.com)

Joe Gross: culture writer: The fact that if you are a geek of any conceivable stripe, boy howdy, is this the town for you. Let’s start with comics. Our very best comics shop, Austin Books and Comics, opens at 9 a.m. on new comics Wednesdays. Pick up your titles, talk shop, then head to work or class. (austinbooks.com)

Pamela LeBlanc: fitness and travel writer: Water skiing beneath the Pennybacker Bridge on Lake Austin as the sun comes up. (During the week, before work, when the water is glass.)

Melissa Martinez: online content producer and entertainment blogger: Hanging out in the grass of the Capitol lawn enjoying a picnic, playing games and rolling down the hills. (tspb.state.tx.us)

Matthew Odam: restaurant and travel writer: He may not have been born here or started his career here, but Willie Nelson put Austin on the map musically. He is the Godfather of Austin, embodying the city’s spirit. His natural ease and Zen nature beautifully represent that to which many Austinites aspire. Some of my earliest memories are of hearing his music and going to his fun run. (willienelson.com)

Dale Roe: lifestyle writer: Watching a slow-moving Round Rock Express baseball game at the Dell Diamond while a cool breeze wafts through the third base side seats offers a welcome respite from the pressures of daily life. A cold beverage, delicious ballpark food, the crack of a bat and the roar of the crowd can make the rest of the world disappear for a few precious hours.

Courtney Sebesta: online news and entertainment editor: Sailing a 30-foot sailboat on Lake Travis and spending long summer days swimming, grilling and watching the sun set with friends.

Deborah Sengupta Stith: music writer: The city’s ethos is built on a spirit of individuality. I’ve walked around town with a shaved head and a giant nose ring and no one batted an eye. After growing up in a small town, I love being in a place where I feel free to follow my oddball muse wherever it might take me.

Jeanne Claire van Ryzin: arts critic: Wandering in and around the 1916 Italianate mansion and lakeside gardens known as Laguna Gloria. (thecontemporaryaustin.org)

Nicole Villalpando: family editor: The Thinkery, which opened last December, is finally the children’s museum Austin deserves. Get your tickets online in advance to guarantee entry and don’t forget to step across the street for one of the coolest playgrounds in Austin. (thinkeryaustin.com)

Eric Webb: online content producer and culture blogger: Going where everybody knows your name at Cheer Up Charlie’s. Calling the über-chill LGBT haven a “scene” would sound contrived. But the truth is that there’s no better place to be young and breathing in Austin on any given night. Been sipping their kombucha cocktails since the bar was on East Sixth? Hankering East Side King trailer grub and live outdoor music (or a drag show)? Ready to get repulsively sweaty to a DJ set of exclusively Beyoncé songs? The pink and blue neon sign beckons. (cheerupcharlies.com)