Texans’ Google searches since the election heavy on secession and SCOTUS

Ever since President Trump took office, Americans have been rapidly Googling the answers to several things. Steve Bannon. The Electoral College. What Donald Trump meant when he tweeted “Easy D.”

Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump speaks during a campaign rally Thursday, July 28, 2016, in Davenport, Iowa. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)
Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump speaks during a campaign rally Thursday, July 28, 2016, in Davenport, Iowa. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)

But for Texans, it seems, the things they Googled the most since November 8 (as of February 1) were both topical and typical.

Estately put together a map of the U.S. based off of what each state has Googled the most since the election. Some are pretty funny, like “Jeb Bush guac bowl” in Illinois and “dabbing Paul Ryan” in Massachusetts.

Others were more closely tied to the election, with phrases like “wall” and “border” popping up on many states’ lists. But the eyes of Texas were upon two Google searches more than any other: “Can Texas secede?” and  “Who will Trump nominate for Supreme Court.”

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Texans’ interest in Trump’s Supreme court pick is understandable. Texas Supreme Court Justice Don Willett made then-candidate Trump’s short list of 11 potential candidates for the U.S. Supreme Court back in May. Trump eventually nominated federal appeals judge Neil Gorsuch to the post. Gorsuch has since decried the president’s tweets about a Seattle judge’s ruling in the immigration ban case.

 

Kellyanne Conway just inspired a ‘Bowling Green Massacre Victims Fund’

If you’re an altruistic sort of person, (and these days, there’s plenty of organizations to donate your hard-earned cash) a new fund established Friday might pique your interest.

“The Bowling Green Massacre Victims Fund” seeks to “directly support the victims and families directly affected by the Bowling Green Massacre” through monetary donations.

bowlinggreen

“As we join together with our thoughts and prayers, we will always remember how our fortitude and compassion unite us all through these difficult times,” the fund’s website reads.

The only problem is that “The Bowling Green Massacre” never happened, and no event in the city of Bowling Green, Ky., in modern history has ever been considered a massacre (unless, of course, you count the University of Memphis’ 77-3 massacre of Bowling Green’s football team last season, but even then, that happened in Memphis).

The fund website is a joke site, a joke made in response to Trump counselor Kellyanne Conway’s Thursday night claim in an MSNBC interview that the city of Bowling Green was the site of a massacre carried out by Iraqi terrorists. She made the erroneous claim in an attempt to argue in favor of President Trump’s immigration and refugee ban.

Conway also raked the media over the coals for not covering the nonexistent event.

“I bet, there was very little coverage — I bet it’s brand new information to people that President Obama had a six-month ban on the Iraqi refugee program after two Iraqis came here to this country, were radicalized — and they were the masterminds behind the Bowling Green massacre. I mean, most people don’t know that because it didn’t get covered.”

In a series of tweets Friday morning, Conway said the slip-up was an honest mistake, and again blamed the media for covering her slip-up instead of her intended remark, which was seemingly in reference to an ABC investigation on terrorists living in Bowling Green. She also steered the conversation toward other media members’ mistakes, and felt she should not have been attacked for her mistake: “Last night, prominent editor of liberal site apologized for almost running a story re: tweet from fake account.”

Bowling Green’s mayor, Bruce Wilkerson, issued a statement on Twitter Friday morning setting the record straight:

“It was recently cited in a national interview that a massacre occured in Bowling Green, Ky. in 2011. That statement has now been corrected.

“While in 2011, two Iraqi nationals living in bowling green were arrested for attempting to provide money and weapons to terrorists in Iraq. there (sic) was no massacre in Bowling Green.

“‘I understand during a live interview how one can misspeak and appreciate the clarification,’ said Bowling green mayor Bruce Wilkerson.”

And as for that donations site? It goes to the ACLU.

Matthew McConaughey’s Trump opinion: What people are saying

Austin actor Matthew McConaughey made waves this week after video was released of a BBC One interview he did over the weekend. The video has since been deleted, but in the segment, interviewer Andrew Marr asked the “Gold” star whether it’s time “Hollywood and the cultural elite of America” gave Trump a break.

Matthew McConaughey and Camila Alves attend a party at the Highball before the Austin premiere of McConaughey's movie "Gold" on Jan. 12, 2017. Contributed by Rick Kern
Matthew McConaughey and Camila Alves attend a party at the Highball before the Austin premiere of McConaughey’s movie “Gold” on Jan. 12, 2017. Contributed by Rick Kern

McConaughey’s answer? “He’s our president. It’s very dynamic and divisive of an inauguration in time that we’ve ever had. At the same time, it’s time for us to embrace.”

The actor known for his “just keep livin'” ethos went on to say, “Shake hands with this fact, and be constructive with him over the next four years. So even those that most strongly disagree with his principals or things he’s said or done, which is another thing, we’ll see what he does compared to what he had said. No matter how much you even disagreed along the way, it’s time to think about how constructive can you be. Because he’s our president for the next four years, at least. President of the United States.”

More McConaughContent: “Going for ‘Gold’: McConaughey talks shady deals, stringy hair”

Fan reaction on social media to the statement was mixed. Some argued that McConaughey was “as dense as the characters who made him famous,” while many social media users remarked that they were glad a celebrity wasn’t advocating for a complete overthrow of the government (like Madonna and Sarah Silverman have done in recent weeks).

And yes, everyone made the same “This is not alright, alright, alright” joke, but one Redditor went for this (now obvious in hindsight) joke instead: “He’s alt-right, alt-right, alt-right…”

Here’s the best of the rest in McConaughey reaction online:

https://twitter.com/AmeriClayton/status/827588852239970304

https://twitter.com/angrypaws/status/827195678149459968

Merriam-Webster gives another vocabulary lesson after Trump’s refugee ban

The Orthodox Union and the Rabbinical Council of America are responsible for the word atop Merriam-Webster Dictionary’s “Trend Watch” tool Monday. The tool tracks popular word lookups on Merriam-Webster’s website and publishes the results in order to provide context about what those words mean.

websters

 

What was that highest trending word on Monday? That would be “anathema,” a noun which here means “someone or something intensely disliked or loathed.” It was trending because The Orthodox Union and the Rabbinical Council of America, two of the largest associations of American Orthodox rabbis and synagogues in the country, released a joint statement condemning President Trump’s executive order to close America’s border to refugees and people from predominantly Muslim countries.

The statement made it into an Associated Press article on Sunday:

“The Orthodox Union, the largest association for American Orthodox synagogues, acknowledged the complexities of fighting terror, but said ‘discrimination against any group based solely upon religion is wrong and anathema to the great traditions of religious and personal freedoms upon which this country was founded,'” the AP report reads.

More: Trump says his order didn’t cause weekend airport chaos

According to Merriam-Webster, “anathema” has been in use in English since the early 16th century, when it was adopted from Latin and Greek. In Greek, it used to mean “anything devoted,” but shifted to mean “anything devoted to evil,” specifically in reference to an excommunication or the person who had been excommunicated. By the 17th century, it began to be used in the way it is used today (especially by the Catholic Church), indicating strong negative feelings to a thing, person, or concept, which may be related to religion, or maybe not.

The two Jewish groups were not the only religious groups that condemned the ban, according to the AP. The U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops said it “strongly disagreed” with the sanctions, and the Conservative and Reform movements of Judaism, Church World Service and more than 2,000 other faith leaders voiced their concern over the ban.

This wasn’t the first time the dictionary has weighed in on matters of national politics. Just last week(!) Merriam-Webster tweeted its definition of a fact at Trump counselor Kellyanne Conway after she claimed that White House press secretary Sean Spicer was simply using “alternative facts” to describe the size of Trump’s inauguration crowd.

 

Austin Twitter to Trump: Don’t tax my Topo Chico

President Donald Trump announced his method Thursday for paying for that border wall he commissioned Wednesday: a 20 percent tax on all goods imported from Mexico.

White House Press Secretary Sean Spicer said the plan would generate $10 billion a year and “easily pay for the wall,” according to the Associated Press.

Later, Spicer said the 20 percent tariff was just one of several options available to the administration to pay for the wall.

The announcement set off a firestorm on Twitter. Users were quick to point out the many things imported from Mexico that would balloon in price if the tax is approved by Congress, like cars and car parts ($24 billion worth, according to CNN Money), telephones ($11.9 billion), refrigerators ($4.1 billion), tomatoes ($1.8 billion) and beer like Corona, Modelo and Dos Equis ($2.8 billion).

But you know what else comes from Mexico?

Topo Chico.

topo2

You know what Texans love?

Topo Chico.

The wonderful mineral water drink started trending on Twitter in Austin shortly after Trump’s tax announcement. Users were passionate, to say the least.

Other users were dispirited about the taxation of other alcohols such as tequila, Corona and Dos Equis. Republican South Carolina senator Lindsey Graham called the plan “mucho sad.”

via GIPHY

https://twitter.com/EvilMopacATX/status/824725208883986434

https://twitter.com/soniasaraiya/status/824719834764247041

What about you? Do you think the tax plan will get approved? What item would you hate to see get taxed?

Texas Trump supporter leaves D.C. waitress a $450 tip on inauguration weekend

Most news stories about restaurant receipts that go viral usually go viral for reasons of outrage. You’ve seen them before: Stories where the server is accused of harboring racist tendencies, or stories where patrons didn’t tip a waitress because of her skin color.

However, one recent receipt story from inauguration weekend has a more uplifting end.

From Flickr user librarianfinsen.
From Flickr user librarianfinsen.

Jason White, a Donald Trump supporter from Lubbock, left a hefty tip on top of his $72.60 bill Monday morning when he and some friends stopped in at Washington, D.C., cultural hub Busboys and Poets. A $450 tip.

The 37-year-old White told the Washington Post he figured he and his friends stuck out among other patrons when he saw all of the social justice-themed artwork on the walls of the restaurant, which also doubles as a bookstore and events space. He put his red “Make America Great Again” cap away before he placed his order.

White’s waitress, 25-year-old Rosalynd Harris, said she came to work that day still feeling energized from the Women’s March that weekend. While she admits she did prejudge White, immediately assuming he was in town for the inauguration solely based on his appearance, the exchange between Harris and White and his friends was “jovial and fun.” A dentist, White complimented Harris’ smile.

More: Up to 50,000 attended Women’s March in Austin, police say

When it came time for the check, White tacked on a $450 tip, meant as a nod to Donald Trump, America’s 45th president. He also left a note:

“We may come from different cultures and may disagree on certain issues, but if everyone would share their smile and kindness like your beautiful smile, our country will come together as one people. Not race. Not gender. Just American. God Bless!”

Harris (who is black) said she was overwhelmed by White’s (who is white) generosity. A professional dancer, she told the Post she started waitressing about a year-and-a-half ago to  help pay bills.

“It’s a huge weight off my shoulders,” she told the Post. “You automatically assume if someone supports Trump that they have ideas about you, but [the customer was] more embracing than even some of my more liberal friends, and there was a real authenticity in our exchange. This definitely reshaped my perspective. Republican, Democrat, liberal are all subcategories to what we are experiencing. It instills a lot of hope.”

As for White, he told the Post that he was so profoundly moved by everything he saw on Inauguration weekend, including the Women’s March, that he wanted to do something to show that Americans have more in common that not.

“We have to think about being better Americans, we have to look into ourselves and how we treat one another,” he told the Post. “If everyone did a little something to show respect…we can love one another. As I sat there I thought about the entire weekend and I thought I don’t know her, she doesn’t know me, but if most Americans have a preconceived perception about people then we’re never going to get better.”

The internet loves Donald Trump’s election party cake, ‘vote spying’ photo

It’s Election Day, otherwise known as the day that keeps on giving beautiful gifts to the internet in the form of memes.

Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump speaks during a campaign rally at the Henderson Pavilion on October 5, 2016 in Henderson, Nevada. Trump is campaigning ahead of the second presidential debate coming up on October 9 with Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton. (Photo by Ethan Miller/Getty Images)
Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump speaks during a campaign rally at the Henderson Pavilion on October 5, 2016 in Henderson, Nevada. Trump is campaigning ahead of the second presidential debate coming up on October 9 with Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton. (Photo by Ethan Miller/Getty Images)

First off, Donald Trump had this surprisingly lifelike cake at his election party, because of course he did. The cake actually looks quite a bit like Trump, facial expression and all. But sorry, Donald, your cake’s hair is a little more luscious than yours IRL.

RELATED: Need a break from watching election results roll in? Check out these cute animal videos

WATCH: Hillary Clinton posted a mannequin challenge video on Election Day featuring Huma Abedin and Jon Bon Jovi

The internet loves it, obviously:

https://twitter.com/bobbyfinger/status/796110567304032257

There’s no shortage of Trump memes this Election Day, like this one that appears to show Trump spying on his wife’s ballot as she casts her vote:

https://twitter.com/natemcdermott/status/796047207816368130

It’s too early to call the election as of this writing, but one thing’s for certain: even if Donald Trump won’t be making America great, these memes definitely will.

People think this new Pokemon looks just like Donald Trump

Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump speaks during a campaign rally Thursday, July 28, 2016, in Davenport, Iowa. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)
Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump speaks during a campaign rally Thursday, July 28, 2016, in Davenport, Iowa. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)

There’s a new Pokemon in town and people are saying he looks just like Donald Trump.

Recently, The Pokemon Company released a five-minute trailer for its upcoming game “Pokemon Sun and Moon” which showed off a few new creatures — including Gumshoos, a mongoose-like Pokemon that shares an uncanny resemblance to the Republican presidential nominee.

Read: The virtual world of ‘Pokemon Go’ is already reshaping the real one

Gumshoos is the evolution of the previously released Pokemon Yungoos and according to the trailer, will act like a “boss” in the game that trainers have to beat.

Read: Is Pokemon Go a good thing for kids? 

According to Heavy, Twitter users immediately noticed the similarities. It’s also worth mentioning the game takes place in the “Alola” region, giving users the ability to make many jokes involving Trump’s campaign slogan.

https://twitter.com/darealsuperseth/status/760187616079802369

No one knows if Gumshoos is actually meant to look like Trump. Maybe by the time the game comes out on Nov. 18, The Pokemon Company will have shed some light on the matter.

There’s a new verb in Mexico and it’s thanks to Donald Trump

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Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump speaks in New York, Wednesday, June 22, 2016. (AP Photo/Mary Altaffer)

Word on the street is Mexico’s got a new word and it’s more than just a little Donald Trump-inspired. Can you say “Trumpear?”

No, no, not “trompear” which means “to hit” or “to punch” — “Trumpear” is a bit more complicated than that.

According to The New York Times, “Trumpear” is one of many ways the people of Mexico have expressed their anti-Trump sentiments, which sparked around the same time Trump began his campaign. The backlash comes after Trump’s naming Mexican immigrants as “rapists” and calling for a wall between the U.S.-Mexico border.

“Trumpear” has been said to mean a number of different things. The Times cites one Mexican reporter who suggested on Twitter that the word means “to hit, to vilify, to polarize, to revile, to terrorize as an electoral strategy.”

Another meaning comes from a technology businessman wrote that it meant “to do the ridiculous then contradict yourself afterwards.”

To read more about how Mexicans are expressing themselves, read the full article here.