Don’t open your eyes underwater at Barton Springs? Here’s what it looks like

Unless you snorkel or open your eyes underwater, you might not have seen what it looks like underwater at Barton Springs, where the water is a cool 70 to 74 degrees.

This is the color of Barton Springs in the middle of July. Addie Broyles / American-Statesman

WATCH: Barton Springs isn’t really 68 degrees. How warm is it?

Well, have a look.

I took this video earlier today with my iPhone in an underwater case that was the best impulse buy of last summer.

RELATED: Former Barton Springs lifeguards recall life on the stand

PHOTOS: Barton Springs Pool way, way back when

As temperatures continues to rise, Barton Springs will fill up earlier each day.

Here are a few tips so you can enjoy your own visit:

  • Parking is already someone chaotic already, so be prepared to walk from one of the upper parking lots in Zilker Park.
  • Entry fee is $3 if you’re a resident of Austin, $8 if you’re not. Kids are $1 or $2, depending on their age.
  • You can pay with a card at one of the meters outside both the north and south entrances.
  • Bring a floatie, but leave the food and drinks behind. You can’t bring anything to eat or drink besides water into Barton Springs.
  • Entrance to the pool is free before 8 a.m. and after 9 p.m. The pool opens at 5 a.m. and closes at 10 p.m.
  • On full moon nights, where people flock to the pool to howl at the moon, the park can fill to capacity, so don’t wait until 9 p.m. if you really want to get in.

RELATED:
At Barton Springs, lifeguard job takes on sunscreen-slathered mystique
Need adventure? Swim naked at Barton Springs
Austin360 Summer Fun Guide

 

WATCH: Who knew baby skunks could be so cute?

It’s baby skunk season! I didn’t know that it was baby skunk season, of course, but when driving in Eastern Travis County yesterday for a story, I came upon a family of baby skunks crossing the road. As I was pulling up, their mom was scurrying off into the woods on the other side of the road, and the five or six babies were still on the road.

Several cars ended up stopping to wait as the skunks crossed the road. They were extremely curious about the cars and the drivers who got out to try to shoo them across the road.

This baby skunk was one of several trying to cross the road on Tuesday in Eastern Travis County. Addie Broyles / American-Statesman

They made the cutest little noises and, though their tails were raised, they didn’t spray.

I think we can all agree that these guys are much cuter than the snake-puking-another-snake video that went viral earlier this week.

Here are some other cute baby animal videos to keep you busy this lunch hour.

WATCH: SeaWorld’s last baby orca born in Texas

Gallery of cute baby animal photos

WATCH: Rare twin horses born in Bastrop County

Manny The Frenchie: Texas Happiness

 

Why you can’t find a bottle of glue around Austin this weekend

If you’re hoping to make slime — the “it” craft project of the moment — you might have to get creative about where you get your glue.

Glitter slime is one of the many different kinds of slime for which you can find tutorials online. It’s become a phenomenon among kids and teens right now.

Slime is the latest craft project to go viral, thanks in no small part to YouTube and Instagram, where DIY lovers flock to share their latest and greatest creations.

My kids and I first made galaxy slime last fall, and the recipe for mixing glue and Borax to make a stretchy, mesmerizing goo has grown so much in popularity that we’ve had a hard time finding glue at local stores.

This was the scene yesterday at Walmart:

I posted about it online, and lots of parents responded with slime stories of their own, including tips about where you can still find glue (Michael’s and Five Below) and reports of having to throw out large quantities from a classroom.

“It’s the new bottle flip trend,” one teacher said.

Although I have been known to ban bottle flipping in certain situations, I like the slime project.

We’ve had fun making it, giving it as gifts and turning it into a lesson about Non-Neutonian fluids, but not everyone loves it. Slime is starting to get banned at schools (and households) for possible burns, stains and plain ol’ parent/teacher annoyance. I also heard on Facebook about some students turning their hobby into a business by selling slime in school.

Have you made slime with your kids? Have you heard about edible slime? Any slime disaster stories to share? We’d love to hear about it in the comments.

Why I’m a feminist who is loving professional wrestling and WWE right now

It’s a good time to be a wrestling fan who happens to be a feminist.

World Wrestling Entertainment’s biggest event of the year, WrestleMania, is this weekend, and this athlete-turned-academic who once hated everything about commercial sports will watch every minute of it.

Two of the biggest male wrestlers, John Cena (right) and The Miz, will be joined in a much-hyped match this weekend with their partners, Nikki Bella and Maryse, who are among the new wave of women wrestlers changing the face of the WWE. Contributed by WWE.

I’ve been a feminist for longer than I’ve been a wrestling fan, and when I first watched wrestling as a high schooler — my first boyfriend was a fan — I didn’t quite know how the two might intertwine many years later when I picked it up again.

I’m drawn to wrestling because of the silly, overdramatic plotlines, not unlike the “Days of Our Lives” era of my youth. (My parents never miss an episode, to this day. Mostly because of my dad. That’s a think piece for another day.) I’m fascinated with the history of the brand. Vince McMahon’s ownership of the WWE goes back to 1980, but he’s the third generation McMahon to helm a professional wrestling league. There have been many leagues, many owners, more tragedies and scandals than you could count, and my boyfriend, Eddie, a wrestling savant if there ever was one, can spin those stories all day long.

Wrestling has all the elements of professional sports that I hated for many years, but now that I’ve started to accept that celebrity drama, outrageous salaries and even bigger egos are part of all of them, even the “real” sports of baseball, basketball and football, I can appreciate the narrative and theatrics of entertainment sports.

If wrestling is as much performance art as sport, what kind of story is the WWE telling these days?

From what I’ve seen in the months leading up to WrestleMania, that message is this: Women are bench-pressing, show-stealing badasses, just like men.


Charlotte Flair, center, is one of the top wrestlers in all of the WWE right now, but Bayley, far left, is a new fan favorite who is considered one of the biggest stars competing at this weekend’s WrestleMania. Contributed by WWE.

In my first round of being a wrestling fan, The Rock and Stone Cold Steve Austin were bringing this historic entertainment brand into the 21st century, trying to find just the right balance of flash, crass and sweaty might. They bad boy days of the 80s and 90s were coming to an end, and wrestlers like Chyna and Lita had fans wondering just what women might accomplish in the ring.

View this post on Instagram

Front page. #womenswrestling #wrestlemania @wwe @usatoday

A post shared by Bayley (@itsmebayley) on

Now, as a cover story in USA Today this week explains, power couple Triple H, a wrestler-turned-exec, and Stephanie McMahon, a wrestling heir-turned-wrestler-and-exec, are overseeing a totally different kind of transformation, one that puts women in the center of the ring, not simply as eye candy or token athletes. The female wrestlers are no longer called “Divas” (even though their reality show plays up that image), and they wrestle in some of the most hyped matches of both “Raw” and “SmackDown,” the weekly WWE shows. The brand as a whole now acknowledges women’s athleticism and ability to captivate an audience that is now nearly 40 percent female.

You could make the argument that the women at the center of this WWE revolution are getting more regular airtime and more viewers than any other female athletes in American sports.

More than 70,000 fans will be packed into the stadium when Wrestlemania kicks off on Sunday, and no one will draw larger cheers than Bayley, a bubbly, kid-friendly pop star of a wrestler who is about to dethrone John Cena as the most popular athlete in the WWE right now.

Bayley currently holds the WWE Raw Women’s Championship title, but even if she loses it in this weekend’s WrestleMania, she’s still considered the most popular wrestler in all of the WWE right now. Contributed by WWE

Bayley is sweeter than Hannah Montana, less racy than Miley Cyrus and tough enough to fly off the turnbuckle to take down a 275-pound opponent. (That opponent was Nia Jax, a member of the extended Dwayne Johnson family, who, in case you were wondering, we think is going to win the title this weekend.)

Sunday’s event is a four-hour celebration of machismo, but there’s a fair bit of fem-chismo, too. Bayley is one of more than a dozen female wrestlers on the roster right now. Some of them star in a pair of reality shows on the WWE Network, including Nikki Bella, who is the real-life and character girlfriend of John Cena and star of “Total Bellas.” This weekend, she’ll stand toe-to-toe with Maryse, the wife of another wrestler named The Miz, and the four of them are scheduled for a tag team match.

MORE: The WWE and the Women’s Revolution: You Wish You Could Wrestle Like A Girl

With Bayley in the pole position and other top female wrestlers, including Charlotte and Sasha Banks, earning top billing, this year’s WrestleMania shows just how far the WWE has come since the Hulk Hogan days, but let’s not get too carried away.

A few weeks ago, my 10-year-old son asked: “Do the men and women ever wrestle each other?” I hemmed and hawed about how they don’t but they should. Eddie cut to a biological fact I like to ignore: That men are, for the most part, fundamentally stronger than women. There are certainly female wrestlers who could match some of the men — it’s been nearly 20 years since Chyna was the first woman to enter the Royal Rumble and Charlotte has been a proponent of more co-ed matches — but I doubt we’ll see full parity in terms of salaries, airtime and match placement, thanks in part to biology but also to the ungodly strength of many of the male athletes that make me question the enforcement of WWE’s rule against steroid use.

WWE still has plenty of misogyny baked into its brand. Xavier Woods, one of the announcers of this year’s Wrestlemania who was also in Austin a few weeks ago to host the SXSW Gaming Awards, got pulled into a sex tape scandal earlier this month, but he’ll still have the mic at Wrestlemania and his career likely won’t take the hit of Paige, the wrestler whose ex-boyfriend allegedly released the tape. We can’t forget that Hulk Hogan’s fragile male ego about a sex tape ultimately took down Gawker. He has been written out of WWE history but because of racial slurs, not the sex tape controversy, even though Chyna’s own sex tape practically derailed her career.

In an arena where it’s hard to separate the drama outside the ring from the drama inside it, we have to pay attention to make sure this women’s revolution in the WWE is actually a revolution and not just a marketing strategy to hook more viewers like me. I still use my critical lens to ask lots of questions about gender, sexuality and race in professional wrestling — the McMahons are, after all, well-known Trump supporters — but that lens also allows me to celebrate small wins.

MORE: How the Drag Queen Cassandro Became a Star of Mexican Wrestling

Right now, that looks like Bayley, a happy-go-lucky 27-year-old millennial dominating the biggest wrestling event of the year.

She’ll be surrounded by super-strong athletic women who are changing our ideas about what women can accomplish in sports entertainment, and a whole bunch of burly men who don’t seem to mind sharing the spotlight.

 

Why ACL might be Austin’s most exciting week in fashion

There’s nothing like one of the biggest music festivals in the country to get a sense of what humans are up to right now.

How we choose to dress ourselves for a massive outdoor event like the Austin City Limits Music Festival isn’t just a matter of logistics. Yes, we need to wear what will keep us from overheating while waiting 10 hours to see Drake, but ACL is also a fashion week of sorts, where everyday people from all over the country show up to Zilker to show off for the, oh, 75,000 other people they’ll run into while they are there.

So, what exactly were they showing off this year?

We were out in force all six days of the festival Instagramming what we call #Austin360festies, the most beautiful, most eye-catching, expressive and even crazy forms of fashion. What’s amazing is that the trends of this year feel like all the trends of the past 50 years smashed into one. We saw so much hippie, grunge, goth, posh and even patriotic wear, but here are some of our favorites.

PHOTOS: All of 2015’s ACL Fashion Festies

Dark lipstick, in non-traditional colors:

Blue hair, on men and women:

Flower crowns:

Flower crowns and flowing skirts:

Floppy hats and flowing skirts:

Fringe, the longer the better:

Lace:

Patriotic attire:

Fanny packs and cutoff shorts:

Gladiator sandals:

Costumes:

Fan gear:

PHOTOS: All of 2015’s ACL Fashion Festies