Definition of “guacamole” continues to lose purity

Guacamole and chips at El Meson restaurant on South Lamar in Austin, Texas on Thursday, August 11, 2011. Photo by Thao Nguyen
Guacamole and chips at El Meson restaurant on South Lamar in Austin, Texas on Thursday, August 11, 2011. Photo by Thao Nguyen

“Guacamole” is becoming a word with loosely defined lines.

People Magazine shared celebrity chef George Duran’s recipe for “Granny Smith Guacamole” as part of their partnership with Taste of the NFL and “their favorite tailgating experts.” Duran’s recipe calls for added one Granny Smith apple, along with more traditional ingredients, for a “subtle sweetness.”

This isn’t the first time publications have trumpeted adding unconventional ingredients to this Texan classic. Last July, the New York Times published a recipe for green pea guacamole and Twitter was not convinced. The recipe recommended green peas to help the guacamole keep its green color, but as one of our writers put it, “Traditional Texas recipes simply don’t call for design skills.”

Duran’s recipe doesn’t sound too crazy, but nothing can beat the classics.

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