Miss Teen USA from Texas criticized for repeatedly using racial slur on Twitter

LAS VEGAS, NV - JULY 30: Miss Texas Teen USA 2016 Karlie Hay (C) reacts as Miss USA 2016 Deshauna Barber (L) and Miss Teen USA 2015 Katherine Haik (R) crown Hay Miss Teen USA 2016 during the 2016 Miss Teen USA Competition at The Venetian Las Vegas on July 30, 2016 in Las Vegas, Nevada. (Photo by Ethan Miller/Getty Images)
Karlie Hay is crowned Miss Teen USA 2016 during the 2016 Miss Teen USA Competition at The Venetian Las Vegas on July 30, 2016 in Las Vegas, Nevada. (Photo by Ethan Miller/Getty Images)

On Saturday, former Miss Texas Teen USA Karlie Hay from Houston was crowned Miss Teen USA 2016. But by night’s end, people on social media had begun posting some questionable tweets from Hay’s past.

According to Mic, Twitter users found numerous old tweets from Hay, who is now 18, in which she used the N-word. As Mic points out, we can’t independently confirm the tweets in these screen captures were posted by Hay because her personal account is now locked as private.

https://twitter.com/VaultJosh/status/759613959989239808?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw

https://twitter.com/omgadina/status/759618036194304000?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw

But after news of the resurfaced Tweets broke out, Hay issued an apology on her Miss Texas Teen USA account.

Former Miss Teen USA Kamie Crawford also joined in on the conversation, stating she couldn’t understand why no one bothered to prepare Hay for media attention.

An armadillo appreciation: 10 facts about the Texas icon

An armadillo near Pleasanton, Texas, in early summer 2016. Photo by Dave Thomas
An armadillo near Pleasanton, Texas, in early summer 2016. Photo by Dave Thomas

They do make live armadillos, you know. Don’t feel bad — there’s many a Texan who only recognizes the critters as mascots and roadkill. A cartoon selling something Texas-y or a roadside relic.

Every Texan, then, should get a chance to see one in the wild. To stand downwind — ew, most wild armadillos could use a good bath — and to see one snuffling, shuffling through the brush, unaware of your gaze even as it stares myopically at whatever it is that commands an armadillo’s attention … how could you not love such a creature? Stand quietly and these tiny armored pacifists might waddle right up to you.

But don’t hug the armadillo! Not if hugging is something you aim to keep doing well. You see, armadillos are known to carry leprosy. And it is possible, though unlikely, for them to give it to you. And they can also spread Chagas disease, which is … seriously, don’t hug the armadillo.

Here are 10 more facts about the Texas icon …

The Jim Franklin-designed poster for The Armadillo World Headquarters. Courtesy of The Bob Bullock Texas State History Museum
The Jim Franklin-designed poster for The Armadillo World Headquarters. Courtesy of The Bob Bullock Texas State History Museum

1. Inspired by the Armadillo World Headquarters — Austin’s home to redneck hippies, hippie rednecks, progressive country music and artists of all sorts from 1970 to 1980 — University of Texas students in 1971 made a push to change the school’s mascot. Yes, from Longhorns to Armadillos. “No,” said everyone over 30, and it didn’t happen. But if you now feel the need to root for an Armadillos football team, there is San Saba High School.

Famed armadillo artist Jim Franklin, left, and Texas singer-songwriter Gary P. Nunn get an up-close look at the armadillo Bee Cave Bob after Bob emerged from his burrow at the West Pole in Bee Cave during the first annual Armadillo Day on Tuesday Feb. 2, 2010. Photo by Jay Janner
Famed armadillo artist Jim Franklin, left, and Texas singer-songwriter Gary P. Nunn get an up-close look at the armadillo Bee Cave Bob after Bob emerged from his burrow at the West Pole in Bee Cave during the first annual Armadillo Day on Tuesday Feb. 2, 2010. Photo by Jay Janner

2. It was artist Jim Franklin who got the armadillo-as-icon thing kick-started in Austin, drawing armadillos on music posters and wearing an armadillo-shell helmet of sorts as emcee at early Austin club The Vulcan Gas Company. He would later design a series of armadillo-intensive posters for Lone Star Beer.

3. Yes. Lone Star Beer. When you were a child in the ‘70s and you didn’t have the Internet, DVRs, more than a handful of TV channels or much of anything besides an early bedtime, randomly catching a Lone Star Beer “Giant Armadillo” TV commercial was like an early Christmas. What? You mean that was just me?

The Texas Memorial Museum features a glyptodon carapace big enough to make you rethink all your "speed bump" jokes about armadillos. Photo by Sung Park
The Texas Memorial Museum features a glyptodon carapace big enough to make you rethink all your “speed bump” jokes about armadillos. Photo by Sung Park

4. There was a giant armadillo, by the way. Just not one with a taste for beer (as far as we know). The glyptodon was around during Pleistocene times and wasn’t the sort of thing you’d just walk up to with a camera and a smile — they could grow as large as Volkswagen Beetles. You can pay homage to these giant armadillos at the Texas Memorial Museum on the UT campus.

These armadillos were digging in a harvester ant mound in South Texas earlier this year. Photo by Dave Thomas
These armadillos were digging in a harvester ant mound in South Texas earlier this year. Photo by Dave Thomas

5. What you are going to see in Texas or the rest of the U.S. is the nine-banded armadillo, one of 20 varieties. No, it can’t roll up in a ball (like a couple of its three-banded cousins). Yes, the females do give birth to four identical quadruplets each time. And they mostly eat bugs, including fire ants and wasps, as well as scorpions. You’re welcome.

A Texas nine-banded armadillo. Really, who could eat one? Photo by Texas Parks and Wildlife Department
A Texas nine-banded armadillo. Really, who could eat one? Photo by Texas Parks and Wildlife Department

6. Do people eat armadillos? Yes. From Texas, to the South to South America, people have eaten and continue to eat armadillos — though not as much these days (remember, that whole leprosy thing). The taste is said to be like pork. In fact, during the Great Depression, people would call armadillos “Hoover Hogs,” blaming President Herbert Hoover for the, uh, creative cooking some were forced to do.

7. Other types of armadillos include the “screaming hairy armadillo” and the “pink fairy armadillo.” Really. Both are found in South America … but only “screaming hairy armadillo” is an awesome name for a band.

No, we won't be showing any roadkill armadillos. We love the critters. But you can occasionally find them on the road posed with a beer bottle like this stuffed armadillo. Photo by Taylor Johnson.
No, we won’t be showing any roadkill armadillos. We love the critters. But you can occasionally find them on the road posed with a beer bottle like this stuffed armadillo. Photo by Taylor Johnson.

8. Roadkill! The nine-banded armadillo’s primary means of defense are jumping straight up and digging into the ground. So far human evolution is winning the battle here: asphalt and fast-moving cars counter these defenses pretty well. Even if a pickup or SUV rolls over an armadillo without hitting it, the dillo is likely to jump up, hit the undercarriage and things go quickly downhill from there for the critter.

9. We are past its 1970s county-fair and small-town festival heyday, but armadillo racing is still a thing. Climb into the little corral and pick the armadillo that likes you the least — with any luck, it’ll run the right way. Placing bets that go beyond the next round of beers is considered bad form.

Ol' Dillo is a mascot for Willie Nelson and Family and travels on the road with the band. Photo courtesy of Ol' Dillo's Facebook page.
Ol’ Dillo is a mascot for Willie Nelson and Family and travels on the road with the band. Photo courtesy of Ol’ Dillo’s Facebook page.

10. Armadillo taxidermy is also a continuing thing. You can buy them in a lifelike pose, roadkill pose, roadkill-with-beer-bottle pose, standing-up-with-toy-holsters pose … or one of each. Perhaps the most famous stuffed armadillo is Ol’ Dillo, who is a mascot for Willie Nelson and Family. Ol’ Dillo has spent the last several years watching the band from the stage and has been swiped a couple of times by overenthusiastic fans. So far, he’s always made his way back on the road again with Willie and Family.

Bradley Cooper: “I was not expecting” backlash over DNC appearance

AUGUST 3 UPDATE:

Bradley Cooper responded Tuesday to the media backlash aimed at him for attending the Democratic National Convention.

In an appearance on CBS’ “Late Late Show with James Corden,” Cooper talks about how he visited his hometown of Philadelphia to attend the DNC with his mother and girlfriend Irina Shayk.

He said he wasn’t expecting the reaction he got from conservatives.

“I wasn’t expecting that…The Republicans were up in arms because I was there listening to the president speak,” Cooper said.

Cooper’s “The Hangover” director Todd Phillips then butted in, saying, “Yeah, but [that was] because you played Chris Kyle in ‘American Sniper,’ which is like the Mob being mad at [Robert] De Niro for being in ‘The Intern.'”

The two of them then regaled Corden with tales of meeting former president Bill Clinton while filming “Hangover Part II” in Bangkok.

Watch the full clip below.

EARLIER:

Bradley Cooper is not a genetically modified talking raccoon. Nor is he a scumbag schoolteacher with a penchant for hangovers. He is also not the deadliest sniper in U.S. history.

via GIPHY

No, Bradley Cooper is an actor, meaning he changes his appearance and demeanor to fit a character.

He’s apparently a very good actor, because he successfully fooled a lot of Republicans into thinking he shared their ideals because he portrayed Navy SEAL Chris Kyle in “American Sniper.”

Those Republicans were not amused when Cooper was spotted at the Democratic National Convention this week, appalled that their favorite actor would stoop to such low depths.

Bradley Cooper, spotted at the Democratic National Convention in Philadelphia.
Bradley Cooper, spotted at the Democratic National Convention in Philadelphia.

However, Cooper has supported the Brady Campaign to End Gun Violence in the past and has donated to Hillary Clinton’s campaigns twice.

That, and actors historically leaning to the left side of the political spectrum, apparently didn’t stop some conservatives from angrily decrying the actor who brought us Sack Lodge and Brian Gilcrest.

 

As is Twitter’s nature, many users made fun of the outraged Republicans.

 

Heaven help them when they find out that Scott Baio really isn’t Chachi.

 

Netflix says ‘Stranger Things’ soundtrack is coming to our ears soon

In case you hadn’t heard, the soundtrack to Netflix’s original series “Stranger Things” is pretty stellar.

stranger-things
Photo via Netflix

Not only does the show — which is set in 1983 — feature haunting, synthy scores from Austin’s own band Survive but it’s full of iconic ’80s tracks, including “Should I Stay or Should I Go” by The Clash, “Atmosphere” by Joy Division and “Sunglasses at Night” by Corey Hart.

Since the show’s debut nearly two weeks ago, “Stranger Things” fans have been calling for Netflix to release the soundtrack and the entertainment company is finally humoring their requests. It posted this tweet yesterday stating “We hear you loud and clear. The Official Soundtrack is coming soon. Over.”

There’s no release date for the soundtrack just yet, but Netflix did create a Spotify playlist that compiles most of the hits from the show. Maybe this will hold you over while we wait for Netflix to make good on its promise.

Also, here’s a little fun fact: the show’s actress Millie Bobby Brown, who plays Eleven, does her own YouTube covers of classic songs and current pop hits.

 

Netflix unveils ‘Gilmore Girls’ revival release date plus new clip

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It’s official: the whimsical world of Stars Hollow will be back November 25.

Read: Rory Gilmore and Michelle Obama talk books, LitWorld, Pop-Tarts

That’s right, today Netflix unveiled the much-anticipated release date for the “Gilmore Girls” four-part revival. The show, which comes nearly ten years after the last episode of the original series, will be available for streaming on Netflix.

Photos: ‘Gilmore Girls’ reunion red carpet at ATX Television Fest reunion

Accompanying the release date, fans were also given a short clip of the upcoming show featuring Lorelai and Rory sitting in their familiar kitchen having a chat. Though it’s a little strange hearing the Gilmore girls discuss Amy Schumer and John Oliver, it’s good to see the characters in action.

 

Baby, are you a rich man? John Lennon’s car is available but it’s not cheap

john-lennons-1956-austin-princess-from-imagine-film-set-to-go-under-hammer-136407546703603901-160725141013
Photo via Getty Images

A classic 1956 Austin Princess limousine once owned by John Lennon could sell for up to $328,000.

Read: $40,000 can’t buy you love, but it can buy a shirt stained with John Lennon’s blood

FILE - In this May 13, 1968 file photo, John Lennon appears at a news conference in New York. Lennon’s 75th birthday will be celebrated next month in New York City at a concert featuring Willie Nelson, the Roots, Steven Tyler and Sheryl Crow. Event producer Blackbird Presents announced Friday that the show will tape at The Theater at Madison Square Garden on Dec. 5, 2015. It will air on AMC on Dec. 19. (AP Photo/John Lindsay, File)
In this May 13, 1968 file photo, John Lennon appears at a news conference in New York.. (AP Photo/John Lindsay, File)

Lennon bought the car with Yoko Ono in 1971 and used it in the film “Imagine.” Then in 2008, the car was donated to the Austin Rock and Roll Car Museum by one of its owners Milton Verret. But now, the vintage motor is being sold to raise money to UNICEF at an auction held by auction company RM Sotheby’s.

Read: Now that you’ll be able to stream the Fab Four: What’s your perfect Beatles playlist?

The car will be on display before the auction in London sometime mid-August. According to the press release, the car is fitted with the five aero plane seats in the back that The Beatles star had added and will come with it original vehicle registration and title document, signed by Lennon.

You can register to bid here. 

Chris Pine and Jeff Bridges are in Austin for Texas film ‘Hell or High Water’

AUSTIN, TX - JULY 25: Actor Chris Pine participates in an Alamo Drafthouse Q&A following the Texas red carpet screening of 'Hell or High Water' on July 25, 2016 in Austin, Texas. (Photo by Rick Kern/Getty Images for CBS Films)
Actor Chris Pine participates in an Alamo Drafthouse Q&A following the Texas red carpet screening of ‘Hell or High Water’ on July 25, 2016 in Austin, Texas. (Photo by Rick Kern/Getty Images for CBS Films)

Captain Kirk and The Dude ventured to Austin last night to have a little chat at Alamo Drafthouse South Lamar.

Actors Chris Pine and Jeff Bridges were in the city for a special screening Monday night of their film “Hell or High Water,” which is about a family who has to try and save their West Texas ranch. The two hosted a Q&A and were joined on stage by co-stars Ben Foster and Gil Birmingham, director David Mackenzie and few more from the crew.

Read: Jared Padalecki and Jensen Ackles partied on Sixth Street over the weekend

Here’s what their Drafthouse appearance looked like according to social media:

Read: The Lonely Island guys ‘never stopped never stopping’ around Austin Friday

https://twitter.com/PeterSHall/status/757778699974352898

Read: Where did the ‘Ugly Betty’ cast party in Austin? (No really, where?)

And after their Drafthouse appearance, Bridges and Pine made their way over to The Continental Club to see country singer Dale Watson. Apparently, Bridges is a big fan and he also gave a shout out to the memory of his friend and musician Stephen Burton.

But the stars aren’t gone yet. The “Hell or High Water” cast gave some interviews at Star Hill Ranch today, just outside of Austin.

 

Here’s a round-up of all the best trailers that debuted at Comic-Con 2016

Photo via Warner Bros.
Photo via Warner Bros.

A thrilling number of trailers for much-anticipated upcoming releases were put online this weekend after debuting at this year’s Com-Con International in San Diego. Here’s a round-up of some of the best ones:

1. “Suicide Squad”

We have another look at the villainous film which comes out August 5.

2. “Kong: Skull Island”

Among the many reboots of “King Kong,” this one features Tom Hiddleston, Samuel L. Jackson, Brie Larson and many more familiar faces. It will be in theaters March 2017.

3. “Wonder Woman”

We got to see Gal Gadot play a pretty stellar Wonder Woman in “Batman vs. Superman” and now it’s time for her own movie. Here’s the first look at “Wonder Woman” which comes out the summer of 2017.

4. “Justice League”

Though many people have their doubts about what director Zack Snyder can do with the DC heroes after “Batman vs. Superman,” the trailer for “Justice League” looks promising. It will be in theaters November 2017.

5. “American Gods”

Starz revelead its first trailer for the television series based on Neil Gaiman’s novel. It’s set to premiere in 2017.

6. “Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them”

This is the most detailed trailer we’ve been given since the film’s first, though it still doesn’t reveal much. The Wizarding World comes to New York this November.

7. “The Walking Dead: Season 7”

So this show is obviously not a new release but the trailer for season seven is. Last we saw in “The Walking Dead” there was a death that might devastate us all but who it was is still unknown. It premiers this October.

8. “The Defenders”

One of Marvel’s latest upcoming series is “The Defenders” which pairs up Jessica Jones, Daredevil, Luke Cage and Iron Fist. The show streams worldwide in 2017.

9. “Doctor Strange”

Here we have the second trailer for “Doctor Strange,” starring Benedict Cumberbatch. The film debuts November 4.

10. “Star Trek: Discovery”

Trekkies got an exciting treat at this year’s Comic Con. A cryptic teaser for the CBS show was released and it appears “Discovery” will take place in the original series’ timeline.

 

 

Watch: ‘Game of Thrones’ season six bloopers have finally arrived

Photo via YouTube/GameofThrones
Photo via YouTube/GameofThrones

WARNING: The following contains spoilers. 

The “Game of Thrones” season six bloopers were released Friday in anticipation of the show’s panel at San Diego Comic-Con — and they don’t disappoint.

Read: ‘Game of Thrones’ creators apologize for Sunday’s episode (Spoilers)

Watch as Tyrion Lannister can’t say the word “benevolent,” Sansa finally has reason to laugh and Daenerys Targaryen can’t speak Dothraki.

Read: ‘Game of Thrones’ star books 2 DJ sets at Austin nightclub

For Texas outlaw Sam Bass, end of the line came 138 years ago this week

One hundred and thirty-eight years ago this week, the notorious Old West outlaw Sam Bass was shot in the streets of Round Rock, right after leaving Quinn’s Neighborhood Bar.

Texas outlaw Sam Bass is buried in Round Rock.
Texas outlaw Sam Bass is buried in Round Rock.

No, that’s not true, 101 E. Main was the Koppel Store back then. And traffic was probably much better. But either way, he was shot on Friday, July 19, 1878 and died two days later, on his 27th birthday.

Bass didn’t take up his outlaw ways until the last 2 years of his life. Among his more honest jobs was racing horses. It wasn’t until he took a herd of longhorn cattle north of Dodge City — pocketing the proceeds instead of paying the cattle financiers, according to “The Handbook of Texas Online”  — that he got a taste of the outlaw life.

After gambling away $8,000 (this was during a time where you could buy a pair of jeans for a little more than a $1 or a pair of shoes for a little less), it’s easy to presume that Bass wasn’t ready to go back to freighting or looking after livestock.

Here’s how the end played out for Texas outlaw Sam Bass …

He started off as a member of the short-lived Joel Collins gang, which hit several stagecoaches for little gain in 1877 before hitting a Union Pacific train near Big Springs, Nebraska, for more than $60,000 in gold coins.

Collins was killed by authorities in short order, but Bass escaped to Texas to form his own gang.

Hey, that train thing worked great, right? Well, Bass didn’t get so lucky again. They tried four trains in the spring of 1878 around Dallas, but mostly what they got was a lot of heat from local posses and the Texas Rangers.

Bass was good at getting away, though. And might have gone on robbing if not for gang member Jim Murphy. Murphy had been captured but Ranger Major John B. Jones let him loose on the condition that he would betray Bass.

Sam Bass, center, is seen with is betrayer Jim Murphy, right. Photo from Austin History Center 9248
Sam Bass, center, is seen with is betrayer Jim Murphy, right. Photo from Austin History Center 9248

John B. Jones was another unique Texas character. A Confederate officer during the war, he took defeat hard and made a run for the border, seeking to establish a Confederate colony in Mexico or Brazil. He eventually came home and was promptly elected to the Texas Legislature, but did not serve. Instead, he took command of the Frontier Battalion of Texas Rangers.

Back to the story at hand, Murphy did betray Bass. Despite being carefully watched by a suspicious Bass, he managed to send a letter to officials from Belton that the gang planned on robbing a bank in Round Rock. (No, they didn’t stop at Robertson’s in Salado for beef jerky — it hasn’t been around quite that long.)

According to this detailed historyJones (in Austin) got Murphy’s letter (from Belton) that Bass was going to hit a bank (in Round Rock) so he sent a corporal to ride horseback all night (to Lampasas), where the corporal then caught the stage (to San Saba) and to the nearest company of Rangers. Man, things were hard before cell phones. Those Rangers would ride furiously (to Round Rock) as Jones and a few other Rangers who were in Austin also headed that way.

Amazingly, everyone arrived in Round Rock on the same day: Friday, July 19. Bass and two of his outlaws went to town to case the bank, only to be noticed by local law enforcement. One asked Sam Bass if he had a gun. And — in a prelude to bad-guy scenes in future action movies — Bass said “yes” and shot him dead. 

The shot attracted the attention of John B. Jones and the Austin Rangers who rushed to a rapidly-developing shootout in the streets of Round Rock. The situation went quickly downhill for the outlaws. One was shot dead and Bass was mortally wounded, though he did manage to get on his horse and flee town — just missing the lieutenant coming in from San Saba (“Hey guys, did I miss anything?”)

The next morning, pursuers found Sam Bass under a large tree, bleeding from a terrible wound. Our detailed history says the bullet “entered his back just above the right hip bone. The bullet badly mushroomed and made a fearful wound that tore the victim’s right kidney all to pieces.” He was taken back to town for medical care, but died on Sunday, July 21.