Here’s why green pea guacamole sounds like an awful idea

Texans take pride in plenty of things, including the iconic green dip for our tortilla chips known as guacamole. So when a new recipe for green pea guacamole was shared by the New York Times, it left a lot of us scratching our heads.

Green pea guacamole, y’all. How? Why? Well, Times writer Melissa Clark digs into the reasons this vegetarian dish is worth trying (though we’re not too convinced).

This recipe gets off to a bad start by requiring at least 45 minutes of your time and a pot of boiling water and giant bowl of ice. This sounds like a lot of work for something we’re devouring with chips.

Clark writes that “peas add intense sweetness and a chunky texture.” Well, so does an ample amount of salsa added in. Seriously, has anyone been to Texas and tried the salsa and guacamole here?

Thao Nguyen/FOR AMERICAN-STATESMAN 08/11/11  Guacamole and chips at El Meson restaurant on South Lamar in Austin, Texas on Thursday, August 11, 2011.  0818xldine

Guacamole and chips at El Meson restaurant on South Lamar in Austin, Texas. ACTUAL guacamole. (American-Statesman file)

Another thing mentioned is that “pea guacamole keeps its bright hue in the fridge for a few days without turning brown around the edges.” My friend, if you have ANY guacamole lying around the fridge for more than an hour, you probably need more guests to share it with or more tortilla chips.

In a city that birthed Whole Foods, fresh ingredients mixed into classic dishes is not out of the ordinary. But scallions, sweet peas and sunflower seeds tossed into a guacamole would raise an eyebrow for many Texans, Austinites included.

We’re not the only ones either. The Twitterverse did not respond well to the Times’ attempt to reassure us it’s a great idea.

If this stuff is good, I think we might have trust issues.

Will you be trying green pea guacamole? Let us know!


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