‘Mad Men’ finale: Read all the reviews

It’s the morning after the season finale of acclaimed and beloved television drama “Mad Men.” That means it’s time to read every review and recap on the Internet for the very last time.

(Justina Mintz/AMC via AP)
(Justina Mintz/AMC via AP)

Well, not every review. But a lot of them. Get to reading about the fates of Don, Peggy, Joan, Pete, Roger, Sally, Betty and the rest, and after you’ve studied up, replay the Statesman’s live chat about the finale with culture writer Joe Gross, online editor Courtney Sebesta, features editor Sharon Chapman and myself.

How to keep the Don Draper lifestyle alive after the ‘Mad Men’ finale

Don Draper is dead. Long live Don Draper.

That’s not a spoiler for the series finale of AMC’s “Mad Men,” airing Sunday. It’s a fact of life, because after the ragged remnants of Sterling Cooper & Partners gulps their last gimlets, it’s the end of Draper’s televised irresponsibility, debauchery and feats of charisma. But much like Joseph Gordon Levitt at the end of “The Dark Knight Rises,” someone must carry on the torch for our departed hero. Be the Peggy Olson you wish to see in the world.

(Photo by Frank Ockenfels 3/AMC)
(Photo by Frank Ockenfels 3/AMC)

Here are seven ways you can keep the Draper lifestyle alive after Jon Hamm shelves his Brylcreem for the last time. Minus the compulsive adultery. And the child neglect, and the identity theft. And … almost everything except for the cosmetic stuff.

  1. Catch a movie in the middle of the workday: New York’s favorite creative director is famous for his frequent escapist jaunts to the movie theater for a little “Casino Royale” or “Godzilla.” You are responsible for the consequences, of course, but why not look up some showtimes and check out of the office early today? We hear “Mad Max: Fury Road” is great, but “Pitch Perfect 2” is also an option. If you’d rather bask in a silver screen classic that Don himself might have played hooky for, check out the Paramount Theater’s summer movie schedule.
  2. Find your favorite bar to get an Old Fashioned: It’s Draper’s drink of choice, after all. Perhaps your poison will be the Bonneville’s peach and ginger version of the classic cocktail; the League has a more traditional version to wet your whistle. Or, as Don often does, you could mix your own. Try this torched citrus spin, or a smoky Oaxacan recipe featuring mezcal. (Also, check out this list of “Mad Men”-inspired cocktails.)
  3. Have a career-stalling breakdown during a meeting: You can console yourself with a Hershey bar. We recommend the ones with almonds.
  4. Head west: As any “Mad Men” fan worth their salt knows, Sally and Bobby’s dad likes to disappear to California for extended stretches of time with no warning. While Don favors Los Angeles, here’s a couple other Golden State options: Anaheim’s Disneyland (where you might want to propose to your secretary, like Don did) or San Francisco (which, come to think of it, might not be too Draperesque of a destination).
  5. Dress sharp: With the show’s plot transitioning into the 1970s during the final season, you’re apt to find a box of skinny ties on clearance somewhere.
  6. Change the conversation: There’s no better way to do it than with a well-emailed GIF.
  7. Check into a hotel for the day: But maybe not for, y’know, the reasons Don might. How about a midday nap after your trip to the movies? There’s a new JW Marriott downtown.

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Dictionary.com expands to include ‘brogrammer,’ ‘revenge porn’

In a move to stay internet-current, another online dictionary is adding slang words and tech terms to its official lexicon.

New_Dictionary_Words_MACK301.jpg
AP Photo/Charles Krupa

Among the new words added Wednesday to Dictionary.com are ‘brogrammer,’ ‘astroturfing,’ ‘smartwatch’ and ‘slacktivism.’

The entries reflect what has been buzzy, what has been in the news and simply, what people do not fully understand.

On their blog (yes, Dictionary.com has its own blog), the company said they tracked what people were searching for and not finding on the site (‘dox,’ ‘microaggression’).

From there they consulted the word’s use in publications and around the web and if significant, gave it official Dictionary.com official word status.

Gender-inclusive words ‘Bigender,’ ‘agender’ and ‘gender-fluid’ are among the new entries in addition to AppleWatch-inspired phrases ‘smartwatch’ and ‘gesture.’

Dictionary.com also updated some words to reflect new connotations and meanings. Now the definitions under ‘basic‘ include “characterized by predictable or unoriginal style, interests, or behavior.”

Terms that failed to make the cut include ‘fleek’ and ‘bae.’

Here is the sample of entries Dictionary.com posted today:

agender: relating to a person who does not have a specific gender identity or recognizable gender expression.
basic: characterized by predictable or unoriginal style, interests, or behavior.
bigender: relating to a person who has two gender identities or some combination of both.
blackhat: a hacker who violates the security of a system for personal profit or for the gratification of causing damage.
completionist: a player who attempts to complete every challenge and earn every achievement or trophy in a video game.
crash blossom: an ambiguously worded headline whose meaning can be interpreted in the wrong way, as “Missing Woman Remains Found.”
dark web: the portion of the Internet that is intentionally hidden from search engines, uses masked IP addresses, and is accessible only with a special web browser.
dox: to publish the private personal information of (another person) without the consent of that individual.
esports: competitive tournaments of video games.
gender-fluid: relating to a person whose gender identity or gender expression is not fixed and shifts over time or depending on the situation.
gesture: a particular movement of the fingers or hand over a screen, used to control or interact with a digital device.
haptics: the study or use of tactile sensations and the sense of touch as a method of interacting with computers and electronic devices.
hyperlocal: focused on a very small geographical community, as a neighborhood.
lifehack: a tip, trick, or efficient method for doing or managing a day-to-day task or activity.
microaggression: a subtle but offensive comment or action directed at a minority or other nondominant group that is often unintentional or unconsciously reinforces a stereotype.
permadeath: (in a game, often a video game) the permanent death of a defeated character, after which the player of the game cannot continue with the same character.
ship: to take an interest in a romantic relationship between fictional characters or famous people.
slacktivism: actions taken to bring about political or social change but requiring only minimal commitment, effort, or risk: students engaging in slacktivism by signing an online petition.
smartwatch: a computing device that resembles a wristwatch and is attached to a band worn around the wrist.

A Texas emoji app is coming

Photo from @TexMojiWe have blogged about the emoji keyboard’s failure to get on Texas’ level a number of times. Even as recently as last month’s iOS update, the keyboard has ignored the countless pleas from the Lone Star state begging for a taco emoji among others.

A country singer and a famous Texas tweeter have finally answered Texas’ emoji prayers: A Texas emoticon app is coming.

Rich O’Toole is a Houston and College Station native as well as a country singer. Sean Compton is the man behind the ‘Sorry, I’m Texan’ twitter account, followed by nearly 87,000. According to KENS 5, Compton and O’Toole met on Twitter, shared a mutual homesickness for Texas and decided to take the matter of being able to show off Texas pride into their own hands.

Partnering with Austin-based app developer Rocksauce and Houston artist Ted Borel, they are creating TexMoji, the first state-centric emoji keyboard.

A few of the TexMojis they’ve already teased to via their Twitter include the long-awaited taco, Willie Nelson braids, a Shiner Beer, Texas bluebonnets and an armadillo.

The app is expected to debut in June.